Yolanda Ridge

Children's Author

BC Arts Council Grant

I’m thrilled to be the recipient of a BC Arts Council Creative Writing Grant to help with the completion of my current work-in-progress, Reasons to Tell. Read more about it in this article by the Rossland News.

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I’ll Give You The Sun

Title: sun_375wI’ll Give You The Sun

Author: Jandy Nelson

Publisher: Dial Books

Reviewer: Yolanda Ridge

ISBN: 978-0803734968

Like We Are All Made of Molecules, I’ll Give You The Sun straddles the line between middle grade and young adult fiction. Unlike We Are All Made of Molecules, I’ll Give You The Sun falls much more solidly into the young adult category.

This book is also told from alternating points of view, twins named Noah and Jude. Interestingly, the chapters from Noah’s point of view are told when he was thirteen-years-old and Jude’s chapters come three years later when she is sixteen. This is not just a gimmick, it is part to the story. In Noah’s chapters, the twins are close and life is pretty good. In Jude’s chapters, the twins have lost their bond, their personalities have switched and it is clear that something has happened to blow their lives apart.

As the story progresses, going back and forth between Noah and Jude’s narratives, readers discover what happened and layers of secrets and deception get revealed. Although Noah (and Jude) are obviously younger in his chapters, the word choice and content may still be uncomfortable for younger middle grade readers.

I’ll Give You The Sun is a powerful, heart wrenching story about art and loss. It has a message for readers of many different ages but will resonate most with those mature enough to relate to the myriad of emotions explored.

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We Are All Made of Molecules

Title: We Are All Made of Molecules6-11-14-molecules-2

Author: Susin Neilsen

Publisher: Tundra Books

Reviewer: Yolanda Ridge

ISBN: 978-1770497795

This book is aimed at a slightly older audience than most of the books I include on this site (in some places it is listed as middle grade, in other places young adult). I’m including it because it’s good – very good – and also because the categorization of books based on age is something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately.

It is told from the alternating view points of thirteen-year-old Stewart and fourteen-year-old Ashley, who are thrown together when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Although Stewart is gifted (or perhaps because of it), he is socially immature and the chapters told from his perspective are clearly middle grade. But Ashley, although only one year older, is in some ways precocious putting both her voice and the content of her chapters into the young adult category.

The book tackles mature content matter, most notably the fact that Ashely almost gets raped, which  may be difficult for some younger readers to process. (It was difficult for me, as well, but likely in a different way and for different reasons.) Still, I would argue that preteen readers should be exposed to some of these issues in the safely and context of the book before they are experiencing it themselves.

This is a topic I will be addressing in future posts. Age of main character, target audience, and content maturity is an issue that’s affecting my own writing a lot lately. In the meantime, I highly recommend We Are All Made of Molecules for middle grade readers (and above) who are ready to tackle more challenging content and love a good book!

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Inside Hudson Pickle Description

Here’s the blurb from Books-A-Million, Amazon, Indigo, Barnes&Noble, and Indiebound:

Cut from AAA hockey last season, seventh-grader Hudson Pickle needs to make the basketball team this year. But, after having an asthma attack at the first tryout, his chances aren’t looking good. His former best friend, Trevor, is also trying out. But he won’t even speak to Hudson since Hudson had all but ignored him while concentrating on hockey. And as if that wasn’t bad enough, now his uncle Vic — who’s been staying with him and his mom since a suspicious fire at his house —has been diagnosed with a genetic respiratory illness. Could this mean Hudson has something worse than asthma? And while this DNA mystery is being unraveled, will the truth about what happened to his father finally be revealed as well?

Yolanda Ridge’s compelling coming-of-age novel for middle-graders combines humor, action and mystery — with a dose of genetic science to keep things interesting. It offers a rich reading experience with complex characters and a multilayered story. Thoughtful, authentic and likeable Hudson will inspire readers with the grit and perseverance he relies on to get through his difficulties, and the self-deprecating wit he uses to manage middle-school social dynamics, evolving friendships and a changing family structure. There are also multiple mysteries running throughout the story — involving Hudson’s father, his uncle and his own health — that are sure to keep the pages turning.

It’s already available for pre-order but won’t hit the shelves until September!

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Cover Reveal!

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It’s off to the printers! Hitting the bookstores in September. More information to follow!

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Gold Rush Bookstore Grand Opening

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The Expendable

THE EXPENDABLE, published in YOUTH IMAGINATION MAGAZINE, is a short story written by my friend and critique partner, Jerry Mikorenda. It is aimed at a slightly older audience than most of the books I review on this site, but it is an important read for everyone, especially today. Check it out.

The Expendable, Youth Imagination.

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Selkirk College Course on Children’s Literature

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New Year’s Resolutions

Part of my resolution for 2017 is to do more teaching. To that end, I’m pleased to announce the following courses I will be offering through Selkirk College:

Introduction to Children’s Literature
Course ID: ARTS 1084A

For those wanting to know more about children’s literature in order to write a book of their own. Learn about the different categories of children’s books and how to identify your target audience. Using examples from current and classic books for readers from newborn to age eighteen, participants will examine what makes a children’s book successful. Leave with a plan for getting your book idea onto the page. Guided by Yolanda Ridge https://yolandaridge.com/
Trail Campus
Section W17T01:
February 2 to March 9; Thursday 7:00pm – 8:00pm (6 sessions)

Creating Your Children’s Book
Course ID: ARTS 1084B

Do you have an idea for a book aimed at children ages newborn to eighteen? In this course, you will learn how to write and revise your book to suit your target audience. In each class, we will examine one aspect of a successful children¿s book and apply it to your work in progress. Includes 1:1 feedback with Yolanda, leave with up to 5 pages of a completed draft.https://yolandaridge.com/
Trail Campus
Section W17T01:
April 6 to May 11; Thursday 7:00pm – 9:30pm (6 sessions)

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If one of your resolutions is to try your hand at writing or learn more about the genre, please consider joining me! Go to http://selkirk.ca/ce/courses/arts-culture/writing find out more.

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Happy Holidays!

There is a lot of talk lately about 2016 being the worst year ever. In terms of world events, I don’t disagree. More personally, however, I realize more every year (and every day) just how fortunate I am. Looking ahead to 2017, I hope to share my good fortune with others and do my part to make the world a more tolerant and accepting place. I’m looking forward to the release of my book, Inside Hudson Pickle (I just saw a sneak peak of the cover and can’t wait to share it here), as well more writing and sharing of good books.

But we still have a few more days left of 2016 and I want to wish everyone a very happy and joyful holiday. I hope we all find a sense of peace that can carry us into whatever lies ahead.

Best wishes. xo yolanda

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